Partners & Journals

AlterNative: An International Journal of Indigenous Peoples is a peer-reviewed interdisciplinary scholarly journal. It  presents indigenous worldviews from native indigenous perspectives. The journal spans themes of origins, place, peoples, community, culture, traditional and oral history, heritage, colonialism, power, intervention, development and self-determination. For further information visit the AlterNative website.

MAI Review was the journal of the former Capability Building programme of Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga. Published from 2006 until 2011, all MAI Review content is still freely available online. To access this content, visit the MAI Review website. 

Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga (NPM) is New Zealand's Māori Centre of Research Excellence (CoRE) funded by the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) and hosted by The University of Auckland

NPM has 21 partner research entities, conducting research of relevance to Māori communities and is an important vehicle by which New Zealand continues to be a key player in global indigenous research and affairs. The centre's research is underpinned by its vision of Māori leading New Zealand into the future and it is focused on realising the creative potential of Māori communities and bringing positive change and transformation to the nation, and the wider world.

MASS is short for “Māori Association of Social Sciences”. MASS is an inclusive organisation that engages broadly with the social sciences to promote our kaupapa that focuses on Māori development. In a very useful contribution at our 2008 conference Moana Jackson framed Māori social scientists as ‘Māori community knowledge bearers’.

The aim of MASS is to promote networking amongst Māori social scientists in their many settings and to foster the realisation of their research efforts in contributing to to Māori development and advancement. Maintaining active links and research relationships can improve the outcomes for our small, scattered, but growing Māori social science workforce by enhancing capability-building, generating research clusters and providing the benefit of collective voice on issues of importance to Māori and social science.