About MAI Journal

MAI Journal is an open access journal that publishes multidisciplinary peer-reviewed articles that critically analyse and address Indigenous and Pacific issues in the context of Aotearoa New Zealand. MAI Journal publishes three issues per year, April, August and December. MAI Journal is only published online. We aim to publish scholarly articles that substantively engage with intellectual Indigenous scholarship.

Publication: open access online only
ISSN: 2230-6862
Frequency: 2 issues per year
Editors: Melinda Webber & Ocean Mercier
Contact: editors@journal.mai.ac.nz

 

MAI Journal 2021: Volume 10 Issue 1

Tuesday, June 29, 2021

This issue of MAI Journal, Volume 10, Issue 1 (2021) contains eight papers covering a diverse range of research areas. This issue reflects the multi-disciplinary nature of MAI Journal beginning with two articles covering Kaupapa Māori early years provision, four situation reports on the COVID-19 pandemic, then an article on identity in academia in Aotearoa New Zealand, closing with a final article envisioning a Kaupapa Māori citational practice.

MAI Journal 2020: Volume 9 Issue 3

Monday, November 30, 2020

The lead article by Jessica Hutchings, Jo Smith, Yvonne Taura, Garth Harmsworth and Shaun Awatere, STORYING KAITIAKITANGA: Exploring Kaupapa Māori land and water food stories explores the Indigenous principle of kaitiakitanga as it relates to Māori agrifood practices.

MAI Journal 2020: Volume 9 Issue 2

Wednesday, July 29, 2020

The lead article by Sierra Hampton, Rights and resurgence in Aotearoa New Zealand: A case study of the united nations declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples role in self determination contributes to the discussion about the Declaration’s effectiveness by analysing its role in advancing Indigenous peoples’ self-determination.

MAI Journal 2020: Volume 9 Issue 4 - Covid-19 Issue

Tuesday, July 28, 2020

In this special Covid-19 Situation Reports Issue, the lead report by Fiona Cram, MAHI AROHA: Aroha ki te tangata, he tāngata explores the impact of Covid-19 lockdown in New Zealand on “bubbles” and the response of Māori leaders to offset increased vulnerability due to confinement, financial hardship, and issues of crowding or isolation.  The report highlights the contribution of mahi aroha by Māori during lockdown and argues that access to quality, aff

MAI Journal 2020: Volume 9 Issue 1 - Special Issue - He Vaka Moana

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Māori and Pasifika students remain as ‘priority learning groups’ for tertiary institutions, a sector of education that often measures success in quantifiable measurables such as grade point averages and timely course completion. While strategic policy documents express an aspiration to make a difference for these learners what is required to bring these policy directions into action to create transforming change.

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