MAI Journal 2018: Volume 7 Issue 2

Publication Date: 
Monday, June 25, 2018

This general issue of MAI Journal, Volume 7, Issue 2 (2018) contains seven articles and one book review covering a diverse range of research areas. This issue reflects the multi-disciplinary nature of MAI Journal with articles from the fields of psychology, education, sociology, population health and language revitalisation. 

The lead article by Tess Chalmers and Mei Wah Marjorie Williams, Self-report versus āinformant-report in the measurement of Māori offenders’ wellbeing considers the value of informant-reported Māori wellbeing alongside self-reported measuring in the context of a correctional setting in Aotearoa. The authors argue that this dual approach to measuring wellbeing is more holistic than existing measures and has the potential to “…inform future assessments of Māori offenders’ wellbeing, in terms of the complexities, issues and implications that exist in the differing methods of measurement.”

The second article in this issue by David Fa’avae is titled Giving voice to the unheard in higher education: Critical autoethnography, Tongan males and educational research. The research presented in this article draws upon the authors own experience as a Tongan teacher and researcher, as a way to legitimise his own knowledge through story.

The third article in this issue by Diana Amundsen, titled Decolonisation through reconciliation: The role of Pākehā identity acknowledges how engagement with Te Ao Māori is critical in the development of Pākehā identity, while simultaneously considering how Māori-Pākehā engagement may also contribute to Māori cultural identity development.

The next paper in this general issue is titled Teacher trainees’ attitudes and motivations towards learning te reo Māori. This paper was written by Russell Pine and is informed by the author’s own Masters Research. This article recognises the significant role that schools play in language revitalisation efforts, and considers how teacher trainees’ see their own roles within these spaces.

The fifth article in this issue is a co-authored paper by Jeremy Hapeta, Farah Palmer and Yusuke Kuroda. The title is Ka Mate: A commodity to trade or taonga to treasure?  This article draws upon existing literature, recent legislation and examples as well as incorporating pūrākau to reflect on the commercialisation of Māori rituals in sport.

The next article is co-authored by Paula King, Donna Cormack and Mark Kōpua and is titled Oranga Mokopuna: A tāngata whenua rights-based approach to health and wellbeing. This article presents Oranga Mokopuna as a decolonial conceptual frame for the realisation of tāngata whenua rights in the context of Māori health.

The final article in this issue is authored by Vincent Ieni Olsen-Reeder and is titled Deathly narratives: Theorising “reo-rientation” for language revitalisation discourses. In this article, the author proposes that there is a need to create a narrative of language vitality around te reo Māori as a way to combat the deficit and death lens which currently dominate the conversation.  

MAI Journal 2018, Volume 7, Issue 2 closes with a book review of the edited collection Critical conversations in kaupapa Māori. The review is by Dr Amohia Boulton.

 

Articles in this issue: 
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.1
Author(s): 
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.2
Author(s): 
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.3
Author(s): 
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.4
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.5
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.6
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.7
Article type: 
Author(s): 
DOI: 
10.20507/MAIJournal.2018.7.2.8